Rabbis Without Borders in the Field: God Appears In Atlanta October 11, 2016

"...While I pray for all of my children–for their health and happiness, and their safety in an uncertain world–I found myself unable to pray for anything in the days following the Orlando attack. I found solace only in the recitation of psalms, in the original Hebrew and in Stephen Mitchell's English adaptations. These rich expressions of human emotion help me feel less alone...."

Rabbis Without Borders in the Field: Meeting Angels October 10, 2016

"...I believe that whether we realize it or not, we may encounter angels in our lives, and we may be angels. As with God, we don't have proof one way or the other of the existence of angels, divine messengers. We have no obligation to believe that they are real. But they are present in Jewish tradition, as well as other traditions...."

Rabbis Without Borders in the Field: Spiritual Not Religious At Rosh Hashanah October 3, 2016

"On Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, I join the seekers who want to create their own language. Because the traditional liturgy seems quite strange to me. Did I really do exactly 22 kinds of sin, one for each letter of the alphabet? Did God really write the list down in a big book? Did Aaron really cleanse the sanctuary by wiping it down with blood? Can I really change my future and the community's future by reciting an Aramaic formula? I don't think so!"

Brad Hirschfield On Rosh Hashanah - A Year Of Kindness October 3, 2016

As Jews around the world celebrate Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, Rabbi Brad Hirschfield wonders what it might look like if this year, ‘we make the decision to let kindness triumph over correctness.’ View Rabbi Hirschfield's discussion below.

From Odyssey Networks’ FAITH ON THE RECORD

As Tight-Knit Jewish Communities Splinter, Shofar Takes Synagogue To The People October 1, 2016

NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday features Rabbis Without Borders Fellow Rabbi Leanna Morrit, who travels to New Jersey and blows a shofar for those too elderly or infirm to attend synagogue. She says that sound is meant to help them take stock of their entire lives.

Read the transcript...

Join the Kirtan Rabbi at Chant for Change on October 8th in DC September 30, 2016

Join as Rabbi Andrew Hahn, The Kirtan Rabbi, will appear at 1:35 pm at Chant for Change on Saturday, October 8th at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.

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From Clal

Rabbis Without Borders in the Field: What My Road Trip Taught Me Just In Time For The High Holy Days September 30, 2016

"My husband and I took a weekend getaway to Toronto. Crossing the Peace Bridge into Canada, it struck me how only one lane was allowing entry into the United States, while several lanes were entering Canada. I wondered, ‘How welcoming does it feel to those who wish to enter the United States?’ I realize there are practical and security issues that went into the design of the border crossing, but I saw it as a metaphor. How often do people enter our synagogues or temples and feel truly welcomed?..."

Rabbis Without Borders in the Field: Inspiration September 30, 2016

"When we open our eyes in the morning, when we are confronted with challenges, when we seek to create beauty, when we seek understanding and insight, encouragement and wholeness and some reasonable assurance that we need to accomplish our goals – we also seek inspiration...."

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By Rabbi Eliana Falk, a Rabbis Without Borders Fellow, from the Rabbis Without Borders Blog on My Jewish Learning.com

Rabbis Without Borders in the Field: Just Do It: A High Holy Day Call To Action September 29, 2016

"...It's good to think teshuvah in our minds and feel teshuvah in our hearts. It's healthy to commit to change behaviors that don't serve us, others or the world. It's right to arouse intention to seek and give forgiveness. Good, healthy and right as our inner turns can be, they aren't fully teshuvah until they spur action where action is possible...."

Rabbi Brad Hirschfield on Turning God’s Prayer Into Our Lived Lives September 28, 2016

"How many times have you said or heard the phrase, Shanah Tovah? Even if you limit your response to this holiday season alone, I bet it's dozens, if not hundreds, of times, and if you think about a lifetime of use, we are probably getting into the thousands. That's a lot of good wishes — both received and offered. But what are we really wishing each other with those two little words?..."

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